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The continuing quest

by | Jul 28, 2014 | safari | 13 comments

1947 Crosley convertible.
According to Wikipedia the cars were made in two factories in Indiana, so the story I was told may be incorrect. The Cincinnati factory was a Crosley property, though.

13 Comments

  1. Anonymous

    Definitely worth investigating. it would've been great if the automobile manufacturers had commissioned typewriters to be custom built for them with the same badges, colours and design features as their cars.

    Reply
  2. Scott K

    Agreed. It is the adventure that counts. Not always the typewriter itself. I'd have done the same thing.

    Reply
  3. notagain

    Me too. Love those cars.

    Reply
  4. Miguel Chávez

    Nice little car!

    I know they were not made by the same concern, but I've always been intrigued by the Ford typewriters… have you ever seen one?

    Reply
  5. Bill M

    Sometimes the safari is more enjoyable than the trophy. Interesting adventures.

    The Crosley was the only car we could not pull over our pit at the body shop where I worked to help restore many old cars during my teen years until I moved to VA. We had a Crosley refrigerator when I was quite young. Crosley also had the first and only RCA 500kW a.m. transmitter that ever went on the air (I think a 2nd one was built by RCA, but it was never sold or put on the air. WLW also still has and not too long ago had it on the air, their 1st 50kW transmitter.

    Powel Crosley & WLW both have a very interesting history.

    Reply
  6. Robert Messenger

    Carl Sundberg, who designed the early 60s Remington portables, helped his friend Powel Crosley in styling Crosley’s late 1940s sedans.

    Reply
  7. Richard P

    I may have seen one in a museum years ago, but never have touched one.

    Reply
  8. Richard P

    Thanks for the memories!

    Reply
  9. Richard P

    So there IS a Crosley-typewriter connection! Leave it to you.

    Reply
  10. Robert Messenger

    Yes, I remember you commenting at the time that Crosley was still a legend in Cincinnati. Apparently John Tjaarda was paid $5000 to submit dashboard designs for Crosley’s Hotshot, but they weren't used. Instead, Sundberg and Crosley did most of the styling. Ironically, Tjaarda’s son Tom Tjaarda, also a car designer, later took to designing typewriters, the SCM Ghia-designed Super G.

    Reply
  11. Robert Messenger

    PS: I know exactly what you mean about a "continuing quest". It's irresistible.

    Reply
  12. Martin A. Rice, Jr.

    How could you!? A computer-faked type-cast! You should be ashamed of yourself!

    Reply
  13. Richard P

    I hang my head.

    My luggage was so full that I couldn't bring a typewriter to California.

    Reply

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