Single-element typewriters on display

Single-element typewriters on display

In 2013 and 2014, I had opportunities to show some of my collection at the Xavier University Library and a public library. That brought good conversations (and an offer of a teletype). Now I’ve mounted another little show at the XU Library, focused on some...
A library show

A library show

On Friday I got my second chance ever to put on a public display of some of my typewriter collection. I got a nice postal letter last month from a librarian in Milford, Ohio inviting me to exhibit some typewriters. Today I brought them over and found that I’d...
Going public (Part 4)

Going public (Part 4)

The final installment in my display at the Xavier University library is intended to introduce viewers to modern portables, unusual keyboards and typefaces, and last but not least, pretty colors. Corona Four (USA, 1928): The successor to the Corona 3, which had a...
Going public (Part 3)

Going public (Part 3)

Installment no. 3 of my public display at the Xavier University library: Hammond no. 1 (USA, ca. 1889): This typewriter invented by James B. Hammond uses an interchangeable swinging sector and a hammer that hits the paper from behind. This model 1 is largely encased...
Going public (Part 2)

Going public (Part 2)

The second installment in my public display has gone live. (Here’s the first installment if you missed it.) The idea behind this selection is to illustrate various compact single-element mechanisms and the development of early portables, as well as some classic...
Going public

Going public

In 19 years as a typewriter collector, I’ve never had the chance to put on a public display of my machines before. But the Xavier University library has agreed to a rotating exhibit of selections from my collection over the next couple of months. There will be...